helyon:

finally.

bookstorey:

The Happy Hypocrite by Max Beerbohm


Max Beerbohm’s (1872-1956) adult fairy tale, The Happy Hypocrite, is sometimes described as a more lighthearted version of Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray. It is the story of a thoroughly immoral man who deceives a young woman into marriage by wearing a mask. Through his love for his wife he is then transformed into a good and humble human being.


The short story first appeared in the literary periodical The Yellow Book in 1896 and was later published 1897. In 1900 it was adapted into a stage show starring the formidable Mrs Patrick Campbell and was revived again in 1936 with Vivien Leigh. The edition in the photographs with colour illustrations by George Sheringham was published by John Lane in November, 1918.


George Bernard Shaw gave Beerbohm the lasting epithet “the Incomparable Max” and his other works include Zuleika Dobson which was ranked 59th on the Modern Library list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. He was also a popular caricaturist whose work appeared in all the fashionable periodicals of his time. Major collections of Beerbohm’s caricatures can be found in the Ashmolean Museum, the Tate collection and the Victoria and Albert Museum.


The illustrator George Sheringham is best known for his theatrical designs for D’Oyly Carte Opera Company for which he created sets for productions including H.M.S. Pinafore and The Pirates of Penzance.


For further book scraps, please follow on Twitter.

likeafieldmouse:

Rooms with a View 

This exhibition focuses on a subject treasured by the Romantics: the view through an open window. German, French, Danish, and Russian artists first took up the theme in the second decade of the nineteenth century.

Juxtaposing near and far, the window is a metaphor for unfulfilled longing. Painters distilled this feeling in pictures of hushed, spare rooms with contemplative figures; studios with artists at work; and open windows as the sole motif. As the exhibition reveals, these pictures may shift markedly in tone, yet they share a distinct absence of the anecdote and narrative that characterized earlier genre painting.”

1. Peter Ilsted

2. Carl Holsøe

3. Léon Cogniet

4. Wilhelm Bendz

5. Alfred Broge

6. Caspar David Friedrich

7. Georg Friedrich Kersting

8. Jacobus Vrel

9. Johann Erdmann Hummel

10. Vilhelm Hammershøi

abbydraws:

HAM!

3D Ghibli food time: Ham and Noodles from “Ponyo”

each-beat:

I remember when we were teenagers and just getting our licenses. I was trying to set you up with one of my best friends, and I wanted it to work out so bad (but apparently you liked me the whole time!) We were all hanging out one day, driving to see a movie (you in her car and me in mine) when my friend randomly pulled to the side of the road. I pulled over to see what was going on. You got out of her car, walked over to mine, and sat in the passenger seat. I looked over at you perplexed, and you grinned but with a worried, concerned look on your face. “I didn’t want you to have to merge on the highway by yourself. I know how much it scares you.” You were (and still are) the sweetest. Who would’ve thought that 5 years later we’d be married and that you’d still be the one to help me calm me down when merging into traffic (and reminding me to breathe when passing huge trucks in the pouring rain).

britain-land-of-hope-and-glory:

Some Very British Problems (x

tastefullyoffensive:

Animals Waving Hello to You [boredpanda]

Previously: Perfectly Timed Dog Photos

cross-connect:

Selected drawings by very talented student from Madison, WI, USA -
Ryan Salge. For more check out his tumblr.

                                     :-)

merpldom:

tuscanystuff:

gutgroan:

i did this poster series for a class project on the right to work. it’s not actually affiliated with the department of labor. 

Too bad this isn’t real because these issues happen FAR too often. 

Please make this real.

©